A New Old Song: blog by Kathie Touin & Graham Brown

Graham writes:

I have been fascinated by the radio since a young age when I started playing around with a small transistor radio, moving on aged 11 (ish) to borrow my parents’ large Grundig radio with its better sound quality. I listened to pop music, naturally, from BBC Radio 1 but also from Radio Luxembourg (English service in the evening) and from the pirate radio stations operating off the Dutch coast.

Then I expanded my listening to include shortwave radio stations from distant lands, as well as news, documentaries, drama and comedy on BBC Radio 4 – and in those days there was comedy on BBC Radio 2 as well (Hello Cheeky anyone?).

My interest has stayed with me for more than 50 years. Today I have a large collection of radios including internet radios, on which I can listen to radio stations from all over the world in good quality sound.

So I was intrigued when I came across a podcast called the British Broadcasting Century, something of a labour of love for its host, interviewer and researcher Paul Kerensa.

The podcast’s website describes it as: “100 Years of the BBC, Radio and Life as We Know It. Be informed, educated and entertained by the amazing true story of radio’s forgotten pioneers.”

It makes for fascinating listening. Thank you Paul.

One edition of the podcast featured a modern recording of an old song about radio listening in the 1920s. It reminded me of something I had seen on social media – the sheet music artwork for a song called There’s A Wireless Station Down In My Heart.

To cut a long story short, Paul was interested in the song and we agreed that my wife Kathie, a musician, would make a recording for his podcast. Kathie was able to obtain a copy of the actual sheet music and discovered the song dated from 1913.

There’s A Wireless Station Down in My Heart has words by Ed Moran & Joe McCarthy, music by James V Monaco. The song was written when wireless did not mean wi-fi like today and even pre-dates radio broadcasting in the sense that we know it. Instead the song celebrates wireless communication via Morse code, in a rather saucy way.

Kathie writes:

I had to laugh when I first read the lyrics to There’s A Wireless Station Down In My Heart. The title is catchy enough but I don’t think you can beat an opening line like: “Oh, there’s something nobody knows/I don’t suppose anyone knows”. It’s surprisingly naughty for such an early song, though people were probably just as naughty then as they are now.

It is another of these recording projects I take on where I think ‘oh, that will be easy and quick’ and four weeks later I’m still messing around with the arrangement. It began with piano for the accompaniment; because of the time period it’s an excellent, ragtime-style piano part and really good fun to play.

When I’d added the vocal I thought it sounded like it needed a bit more. So I added some old fashioned-sounding acoustic drums in the background. (Using software, I hasten to add. I’m a lousy drummer.) It needed a clarinet and a trombone, obviously; sadly I was unable to fake a banjo part which I felt it could have used. Eventually I stopped messing around with it and ended up with the arrangement you can hear now.

One difficulty I had was the form. We were lucky to find the sheet music online but when I looked at it I wasn’t sure what the order of the sections should be. The chorus has a repeat marked at the end so one would assume you play it twice through. But there are two verses. I decided to just go with what seemed the most obvious structure (verse/chorus/chorus/verse/chorus/chorus) but that has meant it’s quite long – it clocks in at over four minutes.

I remember thinking that couldn’t be right because I didn’t think the recording mediums of the time would hold that much music. But doing a quick online search, I see that the predominant recording medium of the 1910s were flat discs, usually made of shellac resin. A 10” 78 rpm disc could only hold three minutes of music – this has survived to this day as the ‘ideal’ length of a pop single – but a 12” could hold up to five minutes. So it’s not inconceivable that the song may have been as long as my version of it when it was released. Assuming it was ever released as a recording.

I had to look up the authors in order to register my arrangement and recording with PRS, the performing rights agency in the UK. I could find nothing on the lyricist Ed Moran, but Joe McCarthy (1865-1943) went on to write You Made Me Love You (I Didn’t Want To Do It) with the composer of ‘Wireless Station’ James V. Monaco (1885-1945). McCarthy has a long list of credits including several Ziegfield Follies from 1919 to 1930 and film credits including Irene and Rio Rita. His most famous song is I’m Always Chasing Rainbows. I do find it amusing it took two men to write the lyrics to ‘Wireless Station’ (“Ev’ry time he sends me a spark/he hits the mark/right in the dark” etc).

Composer James V. Monaco had a stellar career with his songs recorded by Al Jolson, Bing Crosby and Judy Garland among others. His first hit was two years before ‘Wireless Station’ with a song called Oh, You Circus Day from the Broadway review Hanky Panky. Four of his compositions were nominated for Oscars.

It was great fun learning all this while working on the song. And it’s interesting to think about the changes in musical styles as well as the technology for broadcasting and recording these men would have experienced during their lifetimes. They were both born before the advent of wireless radio communication but during their lives it moved from Morse code through the invention of the telephone to proper radio broadcasting as we’d understand it today. Recording technology began as wax cylinders then changed to 78rpm flat discs (which were the forerunners of today’s trendy-again LP records). Both men died just before the advent of LPs and using magnetic tape was just beginning to be seen as a possible successor to wax for capturing music. They would have first experienced recording with the musicians grouped around a large horn to convey the sound to the cutting stylus; a decade or so after ‘Wireless Station’ was written, microphones became more commonplace in recording studios, creating a seismic change in singing styles that led directly to popular music becoming such a dominant force in music.

It’s a lot to pack in to a cute little song about a lonely girl and her anonymous operator sending her sparks in the dark when she’s lonely and blue. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did recording it.

Graham writes:

You can listen to Paul Kerensa’s podcast The British Broadcasting Century via this website or via other podcast platforms. Kathie’s version of There’s A Wireless Station Down In My Heart appears in the podcast which has as its main subject matter “Early Black British Broadcasters” (released on 8 August 2022).

To stream or download Kathie performing There’s A Wireless Station Down In My Heart – either in stereo or old-time mono – please visit Kathie’s Bandcamp page.

Kathie Touin & Graham Brown
August 2022

It’s 2016: relax and spread love

So here we are in 2016 and with it comes many questions. For example, how far can we go into the year and still say “Happy New Year” to each other? Let’s keep going for a little longer yet, and spread positive feelings.

When I was young 2016 would have seemed part of some impossible far-off future with flying cars and jet back-packs but it has arrived and, though much has changed, much has not. And I’m still waiting for my flying car.

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Our Roscoe enjoys a New Year’s Day dig at Newark Bay, Orkney (images: Graham Brown)

Kathie Touin (Mrs Brown) and I enjoyed a quiet Christmas and New Year seeing friends; eating a traditional Christmas meal of turkey and the trimmings (more than once); we attended a service of carols at St Magnus Kirk, Birsay with readings by school children; and we were at a Hogmanay get-together with fellow villagers in Quoyloo’s Old School – complete with a slightly drunken rendition of Auld Lang Syne at midnight.

There are big, and worrying questions in the world at large which I will not go into here. You will all have your own thoughts. But remember when the Berlin Wall was opened in November 1989? It seemed like the end of history, and we would all be living in a safe and happy world. Well, it didn’t work out like that.

I read a New Year blog by Mary Strong-Spaid which struck a chord. Mary wrote: “We must not let the ‘mainstream media’ (with all the negative news) give us the impression that there is no good left anywhere. In countries around the world, there are bloggers uniting in impassioned requests for peace…”

Mary is right – and it not just bloggers. Most people in the world want peace, good health and a decent quality of life for their family. Let’s try to spread love and understanding this year.

For myself, I am not making any big New Year resolutions and creating impossible targets and broken promises. Kathie and I have begun 2016 by clearing some of the junk from our home to give ourselves, figuratively and literally, more room to breathe and so focus on what is important.

I hope to be more relaxed, less stressed, less worried about unimportant trivia – and I hope most of the rest will take care of itself.

Of course, my simple ideas will not work if you find yourself spending the New Year in a refugee camp or with a flooded home. Our thoughts are with you.

In my last blog of 2015 I said I would, before the end of the year, write about our trip to Arizona. I failed to do this. But, in my first blog of 2016, here goes.

Arizona 2: The Return of the Visitors

Regular readers of this blog may have read about our 2014 trip to Arizona – Arizona Dreamin’ – and my impressions then still hold good.

For new readers, we visit Northern Arizona because Kathie’s family moved there to get away from the expense and overcrowding of Southern California. Her parents live in Cottonwood, and her sister’s family is about 30 minutes away in Rim Rock. As DJ Steve Conway remarked on Twitter about Rim Rock: “that place name sounds like a very specialist genre of music!” Indeed.

Our journey from Orkney – off the north-east coast of Scotland – involved three flights, Kirkwall to Edinburgh, then on to Heathrow, and then a direct British Airways flight to Phoenix (Sky Harbor International Airport – what a great name).

Arizona still retains some of the rebellious atmosphere of the Wild West and a do-what-you want attitude. For example, you are allowed to carry guns openly and motorcyclists do not have to wear a crash helmet. It is clearly a very religious place, with numerous churches and church schools dotted across Cottonwood.

Anyway, here are a few memories of our 2015 visit in late October and early November.

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Sunset viewed from our room’s balcony at the Ghost City Inn, Jerome (image: Graham Brown)

We spent a night in the Ghost City Inn in Jerome, a settlement publicised as a ghost town. This is because the town fell on hard times, and most people left, after the copper mining finished. From being a ghost town, ie empty, it has somehow changed to being a ghost town with supposedly haunted buildings. Oh well, it helps bring in the tourists.

Jerome is perched on the side of Mingus Mountain, overlooking – among other places – Cottonwood where we were based for most of our trip. In fact it is only a 15-minute drive from Cottonwood but at 5,000 feet it is nearly 2,000 feet higher and we felt like we were away from it all.

From our room’s balcony at the front of the hotel we could see the red rocks of Sedona, miles away in the distance. We watched a glorious reflected sunset on the rocks – the sunset was actually behind the hotel – and in the morning we were up early in our pyjamas to see a beautiful sunrise.

The town reminded us, in some ways, of our Orkney home. The light has a special quality, rather like Orkney on a fine day, and we came across many talented artists creating beautiful work who have made their home there. There are many historic buildings being preserved which, in a busier place, would have been swept away long ago. So, in some ways, just like home.

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Liberty Theatre, Jerome (image: Graham Brown)

I particularly enjoyed the Liberty Theatre – a 1911 cinema, the balcony of which is being restored as a film theatre (downstairs is a clothes and souvenir shop). The old film posters and projection equipment give it a great atmosphere.

Opposite our hotel we found a strange leftover from the past – a Standard car, very like the one my parents owned when I was small in the early Sixties. It is a make of car you do not hear much about these days when the word standard is almost a negative. It was a right-hand drive vehicle which makes me think it may have been brought over from the UK in later life. Sadly, it did not look like a runner but perhaps one day…

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A right-hand drive Standard car waiting for better days (image: Graham Brown)

Just outside Jerome is the Gold King Mine and Ghost Town, a quirky tourist attraction. Based around an old gold mine, the owner has collected old buildings, cars and trucks which are spread across a large site. Some of the vehicles rust gently in the sunshine, others are beautifully restored. You can also see a 1914 sawmill and a 1928 Studebaker Indy race car (with a school bus engine). It is a fascinating place to spend half a day.

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A few of the many vehicles at Gold King Mine Ghost Town, near Jerome (images: Graham Brown)

The weather for our visit was pleasantly warm – at least it seemed so for us, coming from Orkney – so we mostly wore short-sleeves. There were a couple of cooler, rainy days and one spectacular thunderstorm with lightning flashes and a tremendous fall of hail. Kathie has some sound recordings of this for future use in her own music.

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Scenes from our visit to Yavapai Broadcasting Corporation. Bottom right, General Manager David J Kessel (images: Graham Brown)

We had a fascinating visit to the radio station in Cottonwood, arranged via our brother-in-law who seems to know, or speak to, everyone. To give the station its correct name, it is Yavapai Broadcasting Corporation (Yavapai is the county name). The General Manager, David J Kessel, was generous with his time in showing us around the various stations operated out of their facility – including KVRD Country 105.7FM, Q102.9 (hot hits) and 100.One, Arizona’s Adult Alternative. We also saw historic exhibits, such as old microphones and a transmitter, their OB vehicles and their community recording facility. It was a great visit and we were sent on our way with T-shirts and souvenirs – thank you to David and everyone we met, you are a great crowd.

Other highlights of our trip included Larry’s Antiques Centre in Cottonwood, an enormous collection of antiques, collectibles and second-hand material stored both inside and outside. One of the stalls had a sale and I was able to get a pair of nearly new black cowboy boots for $30, or £20. Bargain!

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Young bears sleeping in a tree at Bearizona (image: Graham Brown)

We spent a happy day at Bearizona, a wildlife park where the animals are given plenty of room to roam. Many of them have been rescued. You drive through the land with the bears and other large animals, then walk through an area where you get close to smaller creatures and the younger bears – some of whom were sleeping in the trees while we were there.

Bearizona is further north from where we were staying, between Flagstaff and Williams on the historic Route 66, so we were at an altitude of about 7,000 feet and there was snow on the ground.

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Amazing what you can buy – Star Wars stormtroopers on sale at Walmart, Cottonwood (image: Graham Brown)

The main store in our base of Cottonwood is Walmart and we made several visits there to buy inexpensive (to us from the UK), jeans, shirts, socks and underwear. In the end we had to leave some stuff behind to make the weight limit for our bags on the return flight but for our next visit we have clothes waiting for us in Arizona.

We had a big tail wind for our return flight from Phoenix to Heathrow so that, at one point over the Atlantic, the information on our entertainment screen was showing that our Boeing 747 – or Jumbo, as you may know them – had a ground speed (not air speed) of 730mph.

Incidentally, there are fewer Boeing 747s to be seen these days, I guess it will not be many more new years before they have disappeared from Heathrow.

Graham Brown

To find out more

Mary Strong-Spaid’s New Year blog – http://storieswithnobooks.com/2016/01/01/wordpress-worldwide-family/

My previous Arizona blog – https://grahambrownorkney.wordpress.com/2014/05/22/arizona/

Wikipedia on Cottonwood – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cottonwood,_Arizona

Wikipedia on Flagstaff – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flagstaff,_Arizona

Wikipedia on Jerome – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerome,_Arizona

Wikipedia on Williams – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williams,_Arizona

Bearizona – http://bearizona.com/

Gold King Mine Ghost Town – http://goldkingmineghosttown.com/

The wonderful expanding universe of radio

We are 15 years into the 21st century and radio might seem old-fashioned in an age of smartphones, tablets and apps but fear not – radio is adapting and, in some ways, I believe, getting better.

I love listening to the radio, and I’ve written blogs on the subject three times before. In 2011 I complained about the programme content from Orkney’s Super Station (it has subsequently closed down); in 2012 I wrote about my childhood radio memories and some current favourites; and in 2014 I wrote about my changing listening habits in the age of the smartphone.

Kenny Everett (image: PA Photos)
Kenny Everett (image: PA Photos)

In the second of those blogs I quoted the late DJ Kenny Everett who once said: “Stay loose, keep cool, keep on trucking, and remember – telly may be too much, but wireless is wonderful.” Quite.

I am returning to the subject again because radio just keeps expanding and, in my opinion, becoming more wonderful. You have to dig around though – too many radio stations available today on FM radio in the UK, and the USA, are heavily formatted, playing the same few songs, and not allowing the presenters the freedom to be themselves.

There are some exceptions and, if you move into the internet and the world of smartphone apps, there are many good choices for your ears.

The station I most listen to is Radio Caroline. I continue to meet folk who think this one-time pirate radio, or offshore radio, station was long ago sunk. But broadcasts continue over the internet and smartphone apps thanks to a dedicated team of volunteers.

These days the station uses a land-based studio in Kent but on special occasions the last Radio Caroline ship, the Ross Revenge, is still used.

As I wrote in my most recent blog (A Remarkable 24 Hours), the Ross Revenge is now moored on the River Blackwater and last month a day’s broadcasting came from the ship thanks to some very clever new technology.

To repeat what Radio Caroline said on their website: “Friday’s experimental live broadcast from the Ross Revenge was a great success. We were trialling a high tech means of getting the signal ashore and into our web streams – a 4G Wi-Fi router fitted with a small outdoor omni-directional aerial to ensure a constant mobile data signal as the ship moves through 180 degrees with the tide.” That’s pretty neat, I would say.

Radio Caroline's Ross Revenge on the River Blackwater (image: Steve Anthony)
Radio Caroline’s Ross Revenge on the River Blackwater (image: Steve Anthony)

The presenters – Kevin Turner, Barry James and Steve Anthony – were clearly having great fun and the sound quality on my internet radios was excellent. I hope they are able to do more of this in the future.

But this is not the only development from Radio Caroline. A new station, or stream to use the modern parlance, was launched earlier this year, Caroline Flashback.

As you might imagine from the name, the music on Caroline Flashback is geared more to the Sixties and Seventies. Gradually – remember this is all voluntary – the schedule is moving from non-stop music to one with regular programmes. These include Caroline favourite Roger Day and a chance to hear again the station’s specialist music programmes such as the brilliant Good Rocking Tonight, presented by Dell Richardson. A schedule appears at the bottom of this blog.

Alongside the main Radio Caroline service – which features largely album music, broadly in the rock category, with knowledgeable, engaged presenters – Caroline Flashback provides a useful alternative, depending on what mood I am in.

Radio Caroline has a fascinating, and still developing, history, much more detailed than I can explain properly here. But, briefly, Radio Caroline began in 1964 with broadcasts from a ship off the south-east coast of England. Shortly afterwards Radio Atlanta began broadcasting nearby but within two months the stations merged to form Radio Caroline North and Radio Caroline South.

This archive film of the briefly-lived Radio Atlanta is fascinating – look at the jackets and ties the “pirate” presenters are wearing:

As I said, Radio Caroline is available through its website, its own smartphone app and through other apps such as TuneIn.

TuneIn is well worth exploring – it streams, onto my phone, stations from all around the world. And, the pro version, which is not expensive, gives me the ability to record programmes.

So my online favourites – such as Steve Conway’s A To Z Of Great Tracks on 8Radio.com, or the archive 1970s Dutch top 20 on RNI – can if necessary be recorded and saved for a convenient time.

New discoveries available from TuneIn and/or my internet radios are made all the time. Recent ones include WGHT 1500 AM, an oldies station in New Jersey (it is fun hearing the adverts and the weather reports); Serenade Radio, an online easy listening station based in England; and KJZZ 91.5 FM, a public radio station in Arizona (where my in-laws now live).

There has also been a significant recent development from the BBC – its excellent BBC iPlayer Radio app now offers the ability to download programmes to my smartphone for listening (without the need for wi-fi, 3G or 4G) at a later date. The sound quality is really good.

It should be noted that most of the programmes are time-limited and, after a certain date, will delete themselves, though hopefully not in the style of the Mission Impossible tapes in the late 1960s US TV series.

But there is also a huge archive of older BBC Radio programmes, for example more than 1,500 editions of Desert Island Discs, which are not time limited.

Incidentally, the FM Radio on my smartphone – in itself an app – was upgraded recently and that now offers me the ability to record programmes.

All of which means that, finally, after more than 40 years, my use of cassette tapes for recording from the radio is diminishing quickly.

Well, I could go on but I must reach for the off switch. Before I go, a quick mention for some of the super programmes I have featured in previous blogs and still love – Alex Hawkins’ Homely Remedies on Frome FM, Alan Waring at breakfast on Biggles FM, and my old chum Graham Lovatt who presents the Eclectic Eel Radio Show via the Mixcloud platform (49 wonderful back episodes are available) and Radio Vera.

Yes, like the actual universe, the radio universe is expanding. What will be next?

Graham Brown

PS Currently listening to Ray Clark on Radio Caroline

My previous radio blogs

Where is the Super Station in Orkney? –
https://grahambrownorkney.wordpress.com/2011/12/12/super-station/

Turn on, tune in, but don’t drop out –
https://grahambrownorkney.wordpress.com/2012/11/30/radio_90/

Radio diamonds in a digital age – https://grahambrownorkney.wordpress.com/2014/07/17/radio-diamonds/

To find out more

Radio Caroline website: http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk/

Wikipedia on Radio Atlanta: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_Atlanta

Alan Beech’s website on MV Ross Revenge: http://www.rossrevenge.co.uk/

TuneIn: http://tunein.com/

WGHT 1500 AM: http://www.wghtradio.com/

Serenade Radio: http://www.serenade-radio.com/

KJZZ: http://kjzz.org/

Desert Island Discs archive: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006qnmr

Homely Remedies on Frome FM: http://frome.fm/programmes/music/homely-remedies/

Biggles FM: http://www.bigglesfm.com/

The Eclectic Eel Radio Show: https://www.mixcloud.com/GrahamLovatt/

Caroline Flashback schedule (as of 24 August 2015, UK times)

Monday
14.00-16.00 Ray Collins (repeat)
16.00-18.00 Roger Day
18.00-19.00 Steve Anthony (repeat)
22.00-23.00 Gary Ziepe: Mellow Show (repeat)

Tuesday
14.00-16.00 Tony Christian (repeat)
16.00-18.00 Roger Day
18.00-21.00 Stafford’s World
21.00-00.00 60s & 70s Request Show (simulcast with Radio Caroline)

Wednesday
16.00-18.00 Roger Day
18.00-19.00 Steve Anthony (repeat)
19.00-21.00 Archive Roots Americana Show (repeat from Radio Caroline)

Thursday
16.00-18.00 Roger Day
18.00-19.00 Steve Scott
20.00-21.00 The Elvis Hour (repeat from Radio Caroline)
22.00-00.00 Barry James

Friday
16.00-18.00 Roger Day
18.00-21.00 Good Rocking Tonight (repeat from Radio Caroline)

Saturday
10.00-12.00 Tony Christian
12.00-13.00 Dave Foster: Retro Chart Show
13.00-14.00 Steve Anthony
14.00-16.00 Ray Collins
16.00-18.00 Graham L Hall
19.00-21.00 Barry James (repeat)

Sunday
10.00-11.00 Gary Ziepe: Mellow Show
12.00-13.00 Dave Foster: Retro Chart Show (repeat)
13.00-14.00 Steve Anthony
14.00-16.00 Brian Cullen
16.00-18.00 Graham L Hall (repeat)

Thank you to the guys on the Radio Caroline Fan Mailing List on Yahoo! for the Caroline Flashback scheduling information: https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/RadioCarolineMailinglist/info

Radio Caroline schedules are on the main station website: http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk/

Radio diamonds in a digital age

 

A microphone? In fact, this is a radio (image: Graham Brown)
A microphone? In fact, this is a radio (image: Graham Brown)

Back in November 2012 I wrote a blog about my love of radio – “Turn on, tune in, but don’t drop out”. The blog was loosely connected to the 90th anniversary of BBC Radio and my scary realisation that I had been listening for about half of those years. I made a reference to “apps available for those of you with smart phones”, a gadget which I didn’t have at the time. But now I do and I realise that as a result my listening habits are evolving. More of that shortly.

Yes, I still love my two internet radios which have opened up a world, literally, of possibilities of listening pleasure. And still my favourite station is Radio Caroline, this year celebrating its, I should say her, 50th birthday.

I still listen to FM radio, particularly for BBC Radio Orkney’s daily broadcast, and for BBC Radios 2, 3 and 4. Sometimes I listen to DAB digital radio and just occasionally good old AM. Remember AM? Or, as it was called years ago, medium wave? Medium wave. It sounds like an unenthusiastic greeting from a distance. “I saw Jim in the high street, can’t stand that man, I just gave him a medium wave.”

Truth be told, there’s not much on AM here in Orkney: we can receive BBC Radio 5 Live, just about, but not Talksport, otherwise there are a few Scandinavian stations and, at night in the winter, you would once have heard the mighty Radio Luxembourg on 208 metres. Remember that? If so, you are older than you are letting on. The last time I was able to check the transmitter is now hired out to China Radio International at night.

But now my smart phone is opening up an even bigger world of listening possibilities. Or perhaps a solar system of possibilities. Or perhaps I’m stretching this simile a little far. Snap, yes, there it goes.

Through my smart phone I’ve discovered the joys of TuneIn Radio, SoundCloud, MixCloud and a renewed interest in BBCiPlayer Radio. In fact, these clever little apps are also available on traditional computers.

TuneIn Radio allows me to listen, broadly, to the same radio stations as on my internet radio. But here is the really clever bit. Pay a small one-off fee – just £2.49 – and you get TuneIn Radio Pro which allows you to record programmes to listen at your convenience, or to keep for repeated listening.

Steve Conway at the microphone (image: Steve Conway)
Steve Conway at the microphone (image: Steve Conway)

One show I like to catch is Steve Conway on 8 Radio, an Irish radio station. He was one of the final DJs on the offshore Radio Caroline and had to leave the ship, Ross Revenge, in a frightening storm after she ran aground on the Goodwin Sands.

Steve is now working through a mammoth task. He presents The A-Z of Great Tracks each Wednesday at 8.00pm, and Saturday at 10.00am (all times UK). Last night he was eight weeks into songs beginning with B (they included Best Of My Love and Bette Davis Eyes), and Steve reckons he has another 13 or 14 weeks of B to go. He must have spent hours pulling this personal A-Z together. Wonderful.

Another show I recorded on TuneIn until recently was Radio Seagull’s Graham Lovatt but Graham has moved – and his show is available on-demand through something new to me, Mixcloud.

How do I explain Mixcloud? Their website proclaims: “Re-think Radio” and “Listen to the best DJs and radio presenters in the world”. It is a streaming service but instead of non-stop music it hosts shows presented by DJs.

Graham Lovatt, a shy guy (image: Graham Lovatt)
Graham Lovatt, a shy guy (image: Graham Lovatt)

Actually, that was fairly easy to explain but how about Graham’s show? Words are not enough, you need to hear it… It is called The Eclectic Eel Radio Show and I suppose you might say it is somewhat in the spirit of John Peel shows but more wide-ranging, and featuring old, sometimes very old, material along with the new.

Earlier in the year Graham described one of his shows with these words on Twitter: “”Hip-hop, Electronica, Musique Concrete, Rocksteady, Haitian jazz, R&B, Bossa Nova, Hindi Disco & Catherine Deneuve!” What more can I say? Fantastic.

Of course, once you start exploring these less well-known radio shows, who knows where you might end up? I think it was a recommendation of Graham to tune in to Alex Holmes who presents two programmes on Frome FM, in Somerset, England – Open Studio and Homely Remedies.

Alex Holmes (image: Alex Holmes)
Alex Holmes (image: Alex Holmes)

Alex’s shows are warm and relaxed, there is usually a live guest, the music is sometimes acoustic, sometimes electronic, very often there is nothing you have heard before. On a recent show I particularly enjoyed Blind River Scare and Keith Christmas, and will be purchasing their music as a result.

And, to declare an interest, Alex’s Frome FM programmes have featured two tracks by Mrs Brown, better known as Kathie Touin, Season Of The Raven and Adam’s Kiss.

But I also mentioned SoundCloud. Well, you could spend all day listening to this. For a start, it is where BBC Radio Orkney programmes are posted in case you miss them. And BBC Radio Shetland does the same – so I was able to listen to the RSPB’s Helen Moncrieff present the station’s latest request show at the end of Shetland Nature Festival.

Among the many contributors to SoundCloud are The Economist magazine, Motor Sport magazine, National Public Radio from the USA, Penguin books, Orcadian musician Fiona Driver, and RTE, the Irish broadcaster.

RTE Radio 1 Documentary On One logo
RTE Radio 1 Documentary On One logo

Earlier this year RTE posted a magical programme from their Documentary On One strand – Sister Brid Is Heading For High Places. It followed a 65-year-old nun, Sister Brid, who had lost her sight, taking part in a charity challenge to climb Mount Brandon in Kerry. As she walked and climbed, those around her described the scenery but it was Sister Brid’s insights into life that gave the programme its vision. Beautiful.

 

I could go on – as you may have noticed – it’s worth another plug for my friend Alan Waring, mentioned in my previous radio blog, who presents a splendid weekday community breakfast show on Biggles FM; a shout for Rory Auskerry, an Orcadian working for the BBC in Salford, who also hosts some pretty loud rock shows, such as Route 66, Sundays at 7.00pm on Pure 107.8FM; hello, from me in Orkney, to islands on the other side of the Earth, and to the Falkland Islands Radio Service; and we cannot forget the seemingly endless great programmes from the BBC available on BBC iPlayer.

These shows are diamonds, some polished, some engagingly raw, but truly diamonds shining in a mass of digital communications. Please go explore.

Graham Brown

To find out more

My previous blog about radio, “Turn on, tune in, but don’t drop out”: https://grahambrownorkney.wordpress.com/2012/11/30/radio_90/

TuneIn: http://tunein.com/

Mixcloud: http://www.mixcloud.com/

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/

BBC iPlayer Radio: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/

Radio Caroline: http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk/

8 Radio: http://8radio.com/

Steve Conway on Twitter: https://twitter.com/steveconway

Graham Lovatt’s The Eclectic Eel Radio Show: http://www.mixcloud.com/GrahamLovatt/

Graham Lovatt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheGrahamLovatt

Frome FM: http://frome.fm/

Alex Hawkins’ Homely Remedies: http://www.homelyremedies.com/

BBC Radio Orkney on SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/radio-orkney

BBC Radio Shetland on SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/bbcradioshetland

Biggles FM: http://www.bigglesfm.com/

Rory Auskerry: http://www.roryauskerry.com/

Fiona Driver: http://www.fionadriver.com/

Falkland Islands Radio Service on TuneIn: http://tunein.com/radio/Falkland-Islands-Radio-Service-883-s111551/

RTE documentary Sister Brid Is Heading For High Places: https://soundcloud.com/doc-on-one/sr-brid-is-heading-for-high